Posts Tagged ‘spam’

Garda Crest

Banks refuse to refund internet fraud victims

Bank customers urged to take more care of personal data

There are countless warnings from banks and police forces advising people to be careful what they download onto therir computers.

Foe example recently Gardaí advised that bank customers should not open phishing emails

Gardaí say they have seen a noticeable increase in cyber-criminals using “phishing” to steal money from people’s bank accounts.

internet search

Since January, up to 250 people have reported to gardaí that they have been victims of the crime.

The amounts stolen vary from €100 to €40,000.

Gardaí advise that bank customers should not open phishing emails, as they may contain a Trojan virus that will be downloaded to their computer.

If they do open one of these emails, they should contact their bank immediately.

They should also never respond to the phishing email under any circumstance.

Bank customers should also ensure their anti-virus software is up to date.

The Garda National Bureau of Fraud Investigation has said the thefts are being carried out by criminal cyber gangs over the web from various jurisdictions.

Some are using so called “mule” accounts in Ireland to transfer the stolen money into.

This can involve the gang paying unscrupulous individuals in Ireland small amounts of money for the use of their accounts, or the gangs themselves setting up their own Irish-based accounts.

Either way, money is transferred out of the victim’s account, into the mule’s account, before being withdrawn locally in Ireland and sent to the crime gangs abroad.

Gardaí say the gangs are based in a variety of locations, including West Africa and Eastern Europe.

However, using remote hosting technology, they can make the phishing emails appear to come from entirely different jurisdictions to the one they are living in.

Gardaí say in many cases banks refund the money that has been stolen.

However, this is not always the case, particularly in circumstances where the individual who has been defrauded has been warned about the dangers.

The Irish Payment Services Organisation has also noticed a spike in phishing crimes.

However, it says that a number of banks in Britain are now refusing to refund money stolen using this technique, because they claim they provide enough warning information to their customers.

One wonders how long before Irish Banks follow suit?

This article includes material from the RTE News Website

Irish Web Design – Banks refuse to refund internet fraud victims

internet users hit by ransom email spam

Internet users hit by ransom email spam

Internet users hit by ransom email spam

The emails appear to be from banks and financial organisations.

Millions of internet users in the UK are at “significant risk” from spam ransomware emails seemingly from banks and financial organisations.

The emails look like invoices or voicemails but in fact contain malware called Cryptolocker, which can encrypt files and the network, demanding payments in Bitcoins, worth about £536, to have it removed.

internet users hit by ransom email spam pc

The UK’s National Cyber Crime Unit (NCCU) warned that emails disguised as posts from banks and financial organisations are aimed at small and medium businesses and millions of bank customers.

In a statement, NCCU said: “This spamming event is assessed as a significant risk.

“The emails carry an attachment that appears to be correspondence linked to the email message (for example, a voicemail, fax, details of a suspicious transaction or invoices for payment).

“This file is in fact a malware that can install Cryptolocker – which is a piece of ransomware.”

NCCU deputy head Lee Miles said that the NCA are actively pursuing organised crime groups committing this crime. “We are working in cooperation with industry and international partners to identify and bring to justice those responsible and reduce the risk to the public,” he said.

Bitcoins have been increasingly targeted by cyber hackers, with about 4,100 Bitcoins valued at over a million Australian dollars being stolen from the online payment processor Inputs.io.

This article originally appeared on CBR

Irish Web Design – Internet users hit by ransom email spam

bank of america signs

Little and Large Websites Attacked

Little and Large Websites Attacked

The coordinated attacks used to knock a large number of websites offline grew became more powerful in the past months. According to the American company Prolexic who run the world’s largest and most trusted distributed denial of service (DDoS) protection & mitigation service, there has been an eight-fold increase in the average amount of junk traffic used to take sites down.

bank-of-america logo

Chase Bank Logo

citi bank logo

wells fargo logo

Attackers have moved on from just using compromised PCs in homes and small offices to flood websites with vast volumes of traffic, and are now using Web servers, which have vastly more more bandwidth available.

The recent ongoing attack on servers running the WordPress blogging application is constantly seeking new computing power that can be harnessed to form vastly bigger botnets.

Prolexic reported that well-financed attackers  are increasingly able to coordinate with fellow crime organizations in the large-scale assaults.

These types of attacks appear to be here to stay and can only be achieved by having access to significant resources  including manpower, technical skills and an organised chain of command.

The most prominent targets of the attacks have been the America’s largest banks, including Bank of America, Wells Fargo Bank, Chase Bank which at times have become completely unreachable following the flood of traffic.

Prolexic believes these attacks are not individual youngsters flexing their muscles, because the efforts involved in the harvesting of hosts, coordination, schedules,  specifics and the sheer military precision of the attacks suggests the presence of experienced criminals that recruit ‘digital mercenary groups’ to do their work for them.

San Francisco-based CloudFlare’s network was recently bombarded by data sent by more than 80,000 servers across the Internet that all appeared to be running WordPress.

Attackers will enter a legitimate user name along with passwords that are known to be invalid, which, when repeated millions of times overwhelms the servers as they perform database lookups and then report the authentication failure which the system struggles to record it in the internal logs.

The vast increase in applications such as WordPress and Joomla  could become to this decade what the early versions of Microsoft’s Windows XP were to the previous decade. In the 2000s it was easy to compromise desktop PCs and turn them into spam-sending engines or botnets to perform various nefarious acts.

Nowadays using a server that is at least ten times as powerful as a desktop computer can do a great deal more damage.

Recent Irish websites that have been attacked include the websites for the Department of Justice and the website of the Department of Finance.

Little and Large Websites Attacked

Irish Web Design

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookCheck Our Feed