Posts Tagged ‘E-Commerce Website’

kimberley cookies

Irish Cookie Regulations

Irish Cookie Regulations – Update

This article was writted by Philip Nolan, Head of Commercial Law Department and Partner MH & C and Oisin Tobin, trainee, MH & C. Philip Nolan is a Partner in the Commercial Contracts and Outsourcing Department at Mason Hayes & Curran.

kimberley biscuits cookies

The Irish Regulations transposing the new European rules on cookies have come into force. While website operators will need to exercise care to ensure that they are complying with the new regime, these new rules are less onerous and disruptive than originally anticipated.

Cookies, or small items of code placed on a user’s computer by a website, are vital to the functioning of the modern web. Cookies allow website operators to determine how users browse their sites and are a technical prerequisite for the operation of more advanced websites, such as those which require their users to log-in. Cookies can also be used, more controversially, to monitor user behavior for the purpose of targeting advertisements.

The rules governing cookies are being overhauled across Europe at present due to an EU Directive adopted in 2009. While all Member States are obliged to implement the Directive, they are given a certain degree of freedom as to the exact manner in which they chose to do so. The Irish measures which implement the Directive, and which have just come into force, seem to minimize the potential negative impact of the Directive for websites and web businesses based in Ireland.  As a result, it would seem that the new Irish regime may prove to be an additional attraction to international web based businesses considering Ireland as their EU base.

Under the new regime, all websites must have user consent before they place a cookie onto the user’s computer.  The Irish rules do not require that this consent be explicit and therefore, it would seem that consent may be implied.  In addition, they must provide the user with clear, comprehensive, prominently displayed and easily accessible information about the cookie, particularly as to its purpose. While this regime is somewhat tougher than the previous rules, which required that websites give a user the ability to “opt-out” of the cookie being used, these new rules contain a number of provisions which should ensure that websites can become compliant without having to radically overhaul their design.  The regulations note that the methods of providing information and giving consent should be as user friendly as possible. In certain circumstances users may be able to give consent via their browser settings and many consider that the use of browser settings for consent may become a popular means of managing consents. Cookies which are technically required to operate the site are exempt from these new rules.

Notably, a provision in an earlier draft of the Irish regulations, prohibiting the current practice of providing the relevant disclosures about cookie use in a privacy policy, has not made it into the final regulations.   This means that privacy policies may continue to be used, once user friendly and prominently displayed, to provide information about cookies in compliance with the new rules.

In summary, it would seem the Minister for Communications has struck quite an effective balance between the privacy concerns of web users in relation to the use of cookies and the concerns of industry in relation to over-regulation of the internet.

Attribute to Philip Nolan, Head of Commercial Law Department and Partner MH & C and Oisin Tobin, trainee, MH & C. Philip Nolan is a Partner in the Commercial Contracts and Outsourcing Department at Mason Hayes & Curran. For more information, please contact Philip at pnolan@mhc.ie or + 353 1 614 5000. The content of this article is provided for information purposes only and does not constitute legal or other advice. Mason Hayes & Curran (www.mhc.ie) is a leading business law firm with offices in Dublin, London and New York. © Copyright Mason Hayes & Curran 2011. All rights reserved.

Irish Web Design – Irish Cookie Regulations

gangsters

Malware creators go professional

The professionalisation of malware

Fagin the crook

Summary of this article: The high-end of malware is reaching a new level quality that comes from it being written by professional organisations with real budgets and high standards. Be afraid.

For many years, anti-malware companies have been capturing immense numbers of new, malicious code samples every day. The actual number is controversial, but it’s in the hundreds of thousands. Not a typo.

These samples are generated programmatically by malware authors trying, by brute force, to create something that will slip through defenses. Most of them are garbage. Anti-malware programs don’t write signatures specific to them, but recognize them by more general characteristics as part of a malware family.

Roger Thompson of ICSA Labs, a security research group owned by Verizon, calls these ‘AFTs’ for ‘Another Freaking Trojan’. The term is meant to contrast with APT for ‘Advanced Persistent Threat’; there’s no standard definition of APT, but basically it’s a more sophisticated malware program which can hide in a target network and perhaps even defend itself.

I spoke with Thompson, who I have known for a long time from his pioneering work for several companies in the anti-malware industry. In a recent blog entry he notes a clear rise in the quality of malware at the very high end of the APT segment; he calls this Enterprise Malware because it is being written by enterprise-class organizations.

Security companies know from their own forensic examination of attacks that this Enterprise Malware can be traced back often to defense contractors and various branches of various governments. We know, at least since Stuxnet (although any fool knew it was going on before), that western governments were developing attack code. We know of similar activities from the PLA (People’s Liberation Army) in China, and now the FBI (with the possible assistance of the NSA) is using malware to infiltrate criminal activities. For years European governments have been open about their policy to allow police to hack into the computers of suspects without a warrant.

Not to dismiss the talents of the last generation of malware writers, but governments and defense contractors have enough budget to hire professionals; I suspect the pool of such people who are willing to work for government is much larger than the pool willing to work for criminal organizations. And with enough patience and talent, we may start seeing malware techniques which heretofore haven’t been worth the trouble. Thompson is concerned about the development of cross-platform malware. We saw an example of this in Stuxnet, which used Windows computers to find and attack Siemens industrial controllers.

As Thompson, who knows a thing or two about anti-malware technology, says, anti-malware software can find the AFTs a very, very high percentage of the time, but you can’t expect it to find these attacks, at least not when it matters. It’s for threats like these that defense-in-depth and rigorous attention to best practices is necessary. For high-value targets, there are also products and services, Solera Networks’ DeepSee series for example, which specifically attempt to find threats which are laying low in a network.

After digesting this information, I was tempted to think that this is good news for those of you under the radar; if you’re not the sort of operation that is going to merit a high-quality targeted attack, then following best practices — e.g. always updating all software and anti-malware, practicing least privilege, forcing strong passwords — then you should be OK. But that’s nothing new. It was always true. The real news is just how essential it is for those who might be the target of a high-quality, enterprise malware attack to follow those practices. And it’s discouraging to see how many organizations fall short.

This is an edited version of an article by Larry Seltzer

Read the full version of this article here:

Malware creators go professional Irish Web Design – Website Security

YouTube Dragons Den Interview by Log Holder Company

The Log Holder Company

Name Seamus Connolly

Equity sought 20%

Investment sought €20,000

The Pitch

Seamus Connolly from Athy, Co Kildare from The Log Holder Company, he is looking for €20,000 for 20% in his company which designs a range of Victorian style log holders which allows your fuel to dry out.

The Outcome

The Dragons check out Seamus’ designs. Barry asks what the costs are to manufacture, Seamus tells him it costs €40 to make one and he sells it for €100. Gavin tells him the costs put him off and asks can he get it down, Seamus tells him he could if he was to produce in bulk. He has sold 70 units to date and hopes to sell 400 in year one with a net profit if €20,000. Barry tells Seamus he doesn’t think the company is scalable so opts out. Sean also tells him he thinks it doesn’t need an investor so opts out. Ramona is the last Dragon to opt out.

Irish Web Design created the Log Holder Company e-commerce website

YouTube Dragons Den Interview by Log Holder Company on RTE Television

Website Photography Training

Website Photography Training for e commerce web owners

photo showing good and bad website product photos

Learn the essentials of creating photos for your own web site or blog with Website Photography Training

Workshops to teach you how to create professional quality images for your Irish shop website

Quality internet photography at a low cost

Learn the basics of photography and advanced techniques to ensure top quality images for your website

For further details of one day, half day workshops and courses for individuals and groups Contact Irish Web Design

Courses include hands on seminars, workshops and all kinds of one to one training course.

Irish Web Design work on Dragons Den

At Irish Web Design we were delighted to have one of our long standing clients appear on the Dragon’s Den recently.

The original Log Holder Company website was purely an information site, and served the business well in its early days of trading.

When Seamus Connolly decided to step up a gear he decided to have an e-commerce website where customers would be able to choose and purchase their log holders online.

log-holder-company-dragons-den-V5-960x330

Irish Web Design designed, printed and mounted the sign that appeared with Seamus in the Dragon’s Den, and featured prominently in the final film.

The Log Holder Company logo was created by Irish Web Design based on an idea by the client.

log-holder-company-hand-crafted-in-ireland-V5-960x330

Despite tight deadlines the website was ready to deal with orders as the show was screened, and was delivered on budget.

New ranges of Log Holders have been introduced and a photo shoot has been booked so that Irish Web Design can create a new set of professional standard photographs.

The new product photos will be used on the online shop and for other promotional purposes such as a new edition of the Log Holder Company’s electronic brochure or e-brochure as they are called.

The site has been well designed when it comes to Search Engine Optomisation, or SEO and began to feature highly on Google straight away.

It was very gratifying to see the Irish Web Design work on Dragons Den, and know that it would serve our client  well.

Visit the Log Holder Company Website Here

E-commerce

E-commerce is defined as being the buying and selling of goods and services by businesses and consumers through an electronic medium. It is most widely considered the buying and selling of products over the internet, but really any transaction that is completed solely through electronic means can be considered to be e-commerce.
There are three categories of E-commerce:
B2B or business to business for example Cisco.
B2C or business to consumer for example Amazon.
C2C or consumer to consumer for example eBay.

It is also called electronic commerce, and some people refer to the sites as shop sites.

Irish Web Design has experience of a wide variety of websites, and specialises in the website design and the Search Engine Optomisation SEO of E-commerce and other websites.

Recently websites have been completed for What Vitamin and Boom Nutrition.

Other websites that contain an element where purchases can be made include Fitness Extravaganza and What’s On Athy.

Follow the links to see how this company integrated the capacity to sell products on the websites.

In some cases the main purpose is sales, for example the What Vitamin site which serves all parts of the Republic of Ireland with a service delivering a wide range of vitamins and related products.

Boom Nutrition specialises in delivering Fitness Nutrition to all mainland addresses in Ireland.

Fitness Extravaganza, or FitEx for short, services competitors who want to enter Ireland’s Premier Fitness Modelling Competition.

Entry tickets for competitors and spectator tickets can be purchased on the website.

DVD’s of the competition can also be purchased online.

What’s On Athy is the website for the South Kildare monthly magazine. An innovation is the Athy Showcase Shop which allows local businesses to sell goods and services without having to invest in their own website.

Different Payment Gateways have been used from AIB Merchant Services, to SagePay and of course PayPal.

QR Codes

WHAT IS A QR CODE?

QR Codes (Quick Response Codes)  are an evolution of the traditional barcodes.
http://scan.me/apps/scan/download/

QR codes can hold significantly more information and are much more flexible.

QR codes can be used for many purposes including to share contacts, links, map locations and much more.

HOW TO SCAN A QR CODE

Open the QR reader app in your phone. ( see below if this is not installed.

Center the QR code in your camera’s viewfinder.

The QR reader will start scanning immediately.
Scanned information will be shown on your phone, without you pressing anything.

If the QR code is a link to a website the site will open in your browser.

If the QR code is a link to a YouTube video, you’ll immediately see video’s image, title and duration.

If the QR code is a geo-location, you’ll see a mini Google Map.

Download free software for reading QR Codes

Android QR Code Apps

scan qr code reader logo

 

 

 

http://scan.me/apps/scan/download/

droid qr logo

 

 

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=la.droid.qr

 

iPhone QR Code Apps

 

scan qr code reader logo

 

 

 

http://scan.me/apps/scan/download/

 

optiscan qr reader logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/optiscan-qr-code-scanner-generator/id304099767?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D6

QR Codes

What’s On Athy Magazine Website Relaunched

Whats On Athy magazine website under maintenance interactive web page

What’s On Athy magazine website relaunched

The What’s On Athy website relaunched recently. This was in time to showcase the August issue of the magazine.

An Athy business directory is now part of the website. Businesses and organisations in the area can create a free listing.

The business directory listing can include photographs and links to a website. There are the usual usual address, telephone and email contact details.

There is room for a full description of the business. This should show up well in Google and other search engine results.

A new look and new features for a popular website.

Free Website

win-a-free-irish-web-design-websiteCOMING SOON!

A competition not to be missed.

Irish Web Design in conjunction with What’s On Magazines are offering one lucky individual, business or organisation the opportunity to have a professionally designed website created free of charge.

Click here for more information

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